Me 210/410 Zerstorer Units...

... from Osprey Publishing

Title: Me 210/410 Zerstorer Units

Author: Robert Forsyth

Publisher: Osprey

ISBN: 978-1-4728-2910-8

Combat Aircraft series number 131 takes on the subject of Messerschmitt's successor to the Me 110, the Me 210 and the improved version, the Me 410. Both essentially the same, but the Me 210 did have a number of faults, which were largely rectified in the modifications made to create the Me 410.
The Me210 was an attractive design, with the first prototype having a twin rudder, very similar to the earlier Me 110. That didn't last though, and it was soon replaced with a larger, single tail fin. The Me 210 did go into service but had a number of faults with flying characteristics and a significant number of accidents. A lengthened and more powerful aircraft became the Me 410, an improvement on the 210 though at first glance in photos they are difficult to tell apart. The Hungarian Air Force used the ME 210 with some success, and their operations are included. After the development story, the book goes on to describe the difficulties it faced in service, and has a good number of aircrew experiences to illustrate the events. It goes on to provide detail of the various units that used both versions, and how it did become a part of the defences within Germany itself against the allied bomber streams. Armament included two distinctive remote control cannon in barbettes on either side of the fuselage, and the 410 was also able to carry a 5cm cannon, adapted from a tank gun, and able to bring down a heavy bomber with a single shot if it hit the target.
This is a fine addition to the Combat Aircraft series and offers good value for money. In addition to the text there is a good selection of archive photos plus more of Osprey's excellent artwork. This includes 10 pages of very good colour profiles, illustrating camouflage and markings. Each of these illustrations have notes which are given at the back of the book. A good reference for aviation historians and modellers alike. As far as modellers are concerned, I can still remember the early Frog model I built when I was young, and as then, I still think the Me 210/410 is an attractive looking design, even if the early Me 210 did not fly as well as it might.

 

Thanks to Osprey Publishing for this review copy.

Robin